The Foveon Sensor

The Foveon Sensor

The Foveon CMOS sensor, as Sigma users know, is unique among camera imaging devices in abandoning the almost universally used Bayer mask approach in favour of a much more elegant three layer architecture which holds the promise of accurate colour rendition at each pixel site. Here, Julian Ashbourn gives his take on the subject

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Backyard Safari Part 4

Backyard Safari Part 4

In the three previous articles on local nature photography we have looked at the basic camera and lens types that can be used to good effect. If this has got your interest roused, you might have found a more specialized interest and want to get some more suitable gear. Here we look at dedicated lenses that fall into ultra telephoto and macro ranges.

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Mark Harwood

Mark Harwood

Mark is a graduate of the University College for the Creative Arts in Kent and worked as an assistant with some of the world’s best advertising, fashion, corporate and editorial photographers before establishing his own central London studio. He shoots a very broad range of work for an extensive a varied clientele, both in his studio and on location worldwide.

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A Professional View by Paul Harcourt Davies

A Professional View by Paul Harcourt Davies

Some self-appointed style gurus have criticised the Sigma digital cameras for their rather angular appearance when, in fact, the basic shape has been subtly morphed in the SD14 to produce a body that fits very well in the hands and feels surprisingly solid – why the surprise well, having used Hasselblads, large Mamiyas, Nikons and others over many years I am a slight plasticophobe.

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Which Macro Lens?

Which Macro Lens?

We are talking here about true Macro lenses, not the marketing hype Macros that are really only a close focussing lens. True Macro photography does not start until you reach the reproduction ratio of 1:1. That means that the image on the film/sensor is the same size as the object the image relates to.

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Backyard Safari Part 3

Backyard Safari Part 3

In this third part of our series on local nature photography we takes a look at the medium telephoto lens in the range of around 70-300mm in 135mm format. This also includes, on cropped dSLR’s, the newer ‘super-zooms’ around 18-200mm. After the standard lens, discussed in part two this is probably the next most versatile and widely available kind of lens.

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What is MTF?

What is MTF?

MTF, or Modulation Transfer Function, is a scientific way of measuring lens performance, But isn't that just stuff for Geeks? Well, no, it does have a bearing on a lens' ability to produce sharp images that goes beyond the photographers technique and goes a long way to explain the difference in prices between apparently similar lenses.

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Back in focus

Back in focus

Check out any photographic internet forum, or for that matter any Photographic Magazine's letters pages and you will inevitably come across posts discussing focusing. The terms 'Back focus' or 'Front focus' crop up regularly, and often it is the lens that is blamed. But is it always the case? We decided to look a little further

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Phil Hurst

Phil Hurst

Phil is a Professional Photographer of considerable experience. He says about himself:- I have to be honest, it was with a bit of trepidation that I agreed to write a short article for the Sigma website. After all I am a photographer not an author and writing about myself feels just a little bit strange.

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Making sense of Sensors

Making sense of Sensors

Over the past half a dozen years or so there have been a myriad of advances in digital camera sensor technology. New advances are still being announced at regular intervals. On top of that, sensor sizes from different manufactures vary from absolutely tiny through to offerings for medium format backs and more.

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Backyard Safari

Backyard Safari

Do you fancy yourself as a wildlife photographer, but don't know where to get started?
Do you think it will be expensive to get the equipment together? Don't have the time to go to all those exotic locations? Well specialist equipment and time away in far flung places just aren't necessary as Ian Andrews explains.

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Winter Photography in Yellowstone

Winter Photography in Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park is rightly regarded as one of the greatest photographic locations on the planet. Yellowstone was to become the first National Park in the United States when it was formed in 1872. The park is the size of Wales and contains over 10,000 thermal features, over 80% of those found on earth. Roger Reynolds explains the attraction.

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